Strawberry Rhubarb Pie – Dutch Style

rhubarb plant with large leaves
The leaves of a rhubarb plant always remind me of elephant ear hostas

Growing up, we had a patch of rhubarb in the backyard. It was on the back corner of my parent’s property, and for some reason, no one minded that we took the lion’s share of the crop each year. I distinctly remember my mother warning me that although we ate the stalks, the large ornamental leaves of the plant were poisonous. For anyone wondering what rhubarb is, I usually compare it to celery. It can be stringy and green. When cleaning it up, you don’t use the leaves or the wide bottom part of the stalk. I like to run a vegetable peeler around the outside of the rhubarb stalks to get rid of any hard, fibrous bits that won’t easily break down when cooked.

diced rhubarb stalks
Close up of diced rhubarb stalks with all those little strings

Although it appears and is prepared similarly to celery, rhubarb is definitely it’s own flavor. Rhubarb is mostly bitter when eaten raw, and it turns into a mix of sweet and sour when cooked. That’s exactly why people have been stuffing it into pies for so long – it gives sweet berries a little more depth of flavor. Another bonus is that rhubarb’s firm stalks don’t break down as easily in pie filling and can help give a pie a subtle bite.

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie - Dutch Style
Our neighbor’s strawberry patch has done so well this year we’ve ordered at least 25 pounds so far!

In coming up with this recipe, I wanted to use the same Dutch style crust I’ve used in the past for my apple pies. I love how simple the recipe is and that the same ingredients are used for the top and bottom. I had to play around with the filling a bit as the strawberries I was using were very juicy and ripe. In the first batch of strawberry rhubarb pie filling I made, the result was more of a jelly than a pie filling. I lowered the amount of water, increased the amount of rhubarb and strawberries, and voila!

Dutch Style Crust for Strawberry Rhubarb Pie
Dutch Style Crust with flour, oats, sugar, butter and a touch of cinnamon

Enjoy this Dutch Style Strawberry Rhubarb Pie at your next get together or just because on June 9 (the official Strawberry Rhubarb Pie Day in the United States)!

Ingredients

Crust:

  • 2 C. all-purpose flour
  • 1 C. packed brown sugar
  • ¾ C. unsalted butter, melted
  • ½ C. quick-cooking oats
  • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon

Filling:

  • ⅔ C. granulated sugar
  • 3 Tbsp. Clabber Girl Corn Starch
  • ¼ C. water
  • 3 C. stemmed and sliced strawberries
  • 1 ¼ C. diced rhubarb
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • ½ tsp. ground cinnamon

Directions

Preheat oven to 350° F.

For the crust: Combine the ingredients using a pastry cutter; reserve 1 C. for topping. Press remaining crumb mixture into a greased 9-in. deep dish pie plate. Bake the bottom crust for 10 minutes while the filling cooks.

For the filling: Whisk sugar, corn starch and water in a saucepan until smooth; bring to a boil. Cook and stir for 1 minute or until thickened. Remove from the heat; stir in strawberries, rhubarb, vanilla and cinnamon. Pour into crust; top with reserved crumb mixture. Set in oven with a baking sheet underneath to catch any filling that bubbles out of the pie while baking. Bake at 350° F. for 40-45 minutes, or until the filling is bubbly and the crust browns on top.

Dutch Style Strawberry Rhubarb Pie
Dutch Style Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

Chocolate Chip Doughnuts with Chocolate Glaze

Pumpkin Doughnuts SquareIngredients:

Doughnut Batter:

  • 3/4 C. unsalted butter, softened (1 1/2 sticks)
  • 3/4 C. granulated sugar
  • 2 lg. eggs
  • 3 C. all-purpose flour
  • 2 1/2 tsp. Clabber Girl Baking Powder
  • 1/4 tsp. Clabber Girl Baking Soda
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 C. (8 oz.) BAILEYS® baking chips
  • 1 C. milk

Chocolate Glaze:

  • 1 1/2 C. milk
  • 1/2 C. heavy cream
  • 1/4 C. granulated sugar
  • 1 Tbsp. plus 1 tsp. Clabber Girl Corn Starch
  • 1 1/2 C. (12 oz.) BAILEYS® baking chips

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 350° F. Place a rack in the center of the oven.

Doughnut batter: Cream butter and sugar. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, until just mixed in. Sift together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and BAILEYS® baking chips. Add dry ingredients to the butter mixture. Then add milk. Mix until well combined and smooth, but don’t overmix.

Grease the doughnut pans. Scoop batter into pans and fill halfway (these will rise quite a bit). Bake for 10-13 minutes. Cool for about 10 minutes and remove from the pan.

Chocolate Glaze: In a medium saucepan, combine milk, heavy cream, sugar and Clabber Girl Corn Starch. Whisk together until the mixture comes to a boil. Remove from heat. Whisk in the BAILEYS® baking chips until they are melted, and the glaze is smooth.

To assemble:

Use a fork inserted in a doughnut hold to dip one side of the doughnuts into the glaze, then flip and dip the second side. Move the glazed doughnuts to a cooling rack with wax paper underneath to catch the drips and allow the glaze to harden before serving.

BAILEYS® Original Irish Cream Baking Chips

About the product

  • Unique, brand new flavor – tastes and smells like BAILEYS® Original Irish Cream Liqueur
  • Brand new product first manufactured in September 2018! Product has a two year shelf life, Our date code utilizes a two digit year, so for example ’20’ represents a bag that will expire in 2020. In front of the two digit year is the month and date the product was packaged, so a code that says ‘Sep 27 20’ means it was produced on September 27, 2018 and will expire on the same date in the year 2020.

Corn Starch Crafts

Oobleck Activities Pinterest

Corn starch is a simple and pure ingredient found in almost every kitchen. It’s made from corn kernels, specifically the starchy part known as the endosperm. Most people use it to thicken soups, sauces, gravies or for batters used in frying (think chicken or tofu). Aside from being a common ingredient in recipes, corn starch is a versatile component in crafts. We have a wide variety of homemade crafts and fun ideas to share with your family in the four blog posts below. From homemade dough ornaments to bouncing balls and pudding popsicles, try our fun recipes and tell us which was your favorite in the comments below!

 

  1. Corn Starch Dough Ornaments
  2. Top Ten STEM Activities with Oobleck Goo (Corn Starch and Water)
  3. Top 5 Kids Activities 2017: Clay Ornaments, Color Run Powder, Soft Dough, Bouncing Balls, Aloe Dough, Sidewalk Chalk
  4. Top 5 Kids Activities 2016: Play Clay, Fizzing Flour, Big Bubbles, Silly Dough, Pudding Popsicles

Peanut Butter Cookie Sandwiches

Peanut Butter Sandwich CookiesPeanut Butter Cookie Sandwiches

Ingredients:

  • 1 C. unsalted butter, slightly softened
  • 2/3 C. smooth peanut butter
  • 1 3/4 C. packed dark brown sugar
  • 2 lg. eggs
  • 3 Tbsp. light or dark corn syrup
  • 2 1/2 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 tsp. Davis Baking Powder
  • 1/4 tsp. Clabber Girl Baking Soda
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 3 2/3 C. all-purpose flour
  • 9 oz. semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 9 oz. peanut butter chips
  • 3/4 C. finely chopped salted peanuts, optional
  • chocolate frosting
  • Mini marshmallows

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 350° F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper, or spray with nonstick spray, then set aside.

In a large mixer bowl with the mixer on low, then medium speed, beat together the butter, peanut butter, sugar, eggs, corn syrup, vanilla, baking powder, baking soda and salt until well blended and lightened in color, about 2 minutes. Working on low speed, beat in half the flour. Stir in the remaining flour, chocolate, peanut butter morsels and peanuts (if using) just until thoroughly incorporated. Let stand 10 to 15 minutes to firm up slightly.

Divide the dough into quarters. Then divide each quarter into 9 balls; space them about 3 1/2 inches apart on baking sheets. With the heel of the hand, press down on the balls until about 2 1/2 inches in diameter. Finish each cookie by adding crisscross marks with the tines of a large dinner fork.

Bake in the middle third of the oven for 9 to 14 minutes or until the cookies are just tinged with brown and barely firm when tapped in the center; be careful not to over-bake. Remove the pans from the oven. Let the cookies firm up several minutes. Using a wide-bladed spatula, transfer the cookies to racks and let cool completely.

To assemble:

Spread or pipe frosting on bottom of one cookie. Lay another cookie on top of frosting, leaving room for the marshmallow teeth.

Use scissors to cut marshmallows into triangle shapes for teeth (you’ll need enough teeth for 18 cookie sandwiches). For the eyes, use scissors to cut marshmallows in half. Use a toothpick to add a chocolate eye in the center of each.

Gingerbread Skeleton Cookies

Gingerbread Skeleton CookiesGingerbread Skeleton Cookies

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 C. softened butter
  • 1/2 C. granulated sugar
  • 1/2 C. molasses
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 2 C. sifted all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp. Clabber Girl Baking Powder
  • 1/2 tsp. Clabber Girl Baking Soda
  • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp. ground cloves
  • 1/2 tsp. ground ginger
  • 1/2 tsp. ground nutmeg

In a large bowl, cream together the butter and sugar until smooth. Stir in molasses and egg yolk. In a separate bowl combine flour, salt, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, cloves, ginger and nutmeg. Add creamed mixture and mix until smooth. Cover the bowl and chill for at least two hours.

Preheat the oven to 350° F. On a floured workspace, roll out the dough out to a 1/4 inch thickness. Cut into gingerbread men shapes with cookie cutters.

Place cookies 2 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheets and bake for 8 to 10 minutes, until cookies are firm. Remove from cookie sheets to cool on wire racks. Cool completely before decorating.

Royal Icing

Ingredients:

  • 4 1/2 Tbsp. meringue powder, sifted
  • 6 C. powdered sugar, sifted
  • 1 1/2 tsp. vanilla or almond extract, optional
  • Water
  • Food coloring

Directions:

  1. Whisk meringue powder and powdered sugar together in a bowl. Stir in extract (if using).
  2. With a kitchen faucet turned on very low, slowly add water while stirring until icing reaches the desired consistency.

To test consistency:

  • Drizzle some icing with your spatula into the bowl of icing
  • The drizzles should “melt” back into the icing in 5-10 seconds
  • Less than 5 seconds – it’s too thin; add sifted powdered sugar 1 Tbsp. at a time until correct consistency
  • More than 10 seconds – it’s too thick; add water until correct consistency

Adding Color:

Lastly, stir in food coloring, if using a brown base on the cookies (recommended). For dark pigments, you may want to make the icing a day in advance for a brighter color. Stir day-old icing vigorously to re-incorporate.

Decorating Gingerbread Skeleton Cookies:

  1. Use an offset spatula and spread brown base of icing over cookie then let the icing fully dry.
  2. Use a #3 tip and pipe white icing to form outlines of skull and bones shape. Fill the outlines and use a toothpick to spread the icing evenly in your shapes.
  3. Use a #2 tip and pipe white icing dots for teeth and toes.

Sweet Potato and Pecan Waffles

Sweet Potato and Pecan Waffles Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 1 3/4 C. all-purpose flour
  • 1 Tbsp. Clabber Girl Baking Powder
  • 1 tsp. Kosher salt
  • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • 6 Tbsp. melted butter
  • 1/2 C. toasted pecans
  • 1 C. sweet potato, cooked and mashed
  • 2 lg. eggs
  • 1 1/2 C. milk

Directions:

In a medium sized mixing bowl, combine flour, baking powder, salt and cinnamon. Stir well.

Beat 2 eggs in a bowl and stir in melted butter and milk.

Pour the wet ingredients into the dry mix and stir in sweet potatoes and pecans

Make waffles according to waffle iron instructions.

Top with additional toasted pecans and maple syrup.

Corn Starch Dough Ornaments

Corn Starch Ornaments on Tree LR
Homemade ornaments are so easy to make with just two everyday ingredients you probably already have on-hand: baking soda and corn starch. Corn starch dough is fun to mold and can last indefinitely once it is completely dry. Compared to a flour-based dough recipe, corn starch dough:
  • Feels silky to the touch
  • Is easy to knead
  • Doesn’t contain gluten
  • Won’t dry out your hands
  • Dries into a bright white color
White Corn Starch Dough Ornaments

Corn Starch Dough Recipe

INGREDIENTS
1/2 C. Clabber Girl Corn Starch
1 C. Clabber Girl Baking Soda
3/4 C. water
Cookie Cutters
Decorations, as desired
String/ribbon
Straw
Corn Starch Ornaments on Tree LRDIRECTIONS
  1. Combine the corn starch, baking soda and water in a medium sauce pan. Turn on heat to medium. Stir ingredients until the mixture starts to thicken, about 2-3 minutes, then remove from heat. The mixture should look like mashed potatoes when it is the right consistency. Let the dough cool for several minutes until it is just warm to the touch.
  2. Preheat the oven to 175° F.
  3. Remove the dough onto a cutting board or non-stick surface dusted with corn starch. Immediately add soap and water to your saucepan for easier clean up. Knead the dough so that it forms a ball. Roll dough to be 1/4-inch thick. Add more corn starch if you feel the dough is too sticky. Avoid over-handling the dough, this may cause more cracks when the dough dries.
  4. Cut out shapes and decorate the ornaments as desired. Use a straw to create a hole large enough for your string or ribbon to fit through. After you’ve cut shapes, you may reform the dough and cut again, but the second batch of shapes may develop more flaking or cracks.
  5. Arrange the shapes on a parchment lined baking sheet.
  6. The key to getting perfect ornaments (ones without flakes or cracks) is to dry the ornaments very slowly. Bake them at a low heat,175° F., for 45-60 minutes. Turn the ornaments over half way. The ornaments are done when they are completely white and your nail can’t make a dent in the dough. Depending on how thick your ornaments are, this can take longer than an hour. At such a low heat, you won’t brown the ornaments unless they are over-baked for a very long time.
  7. Let the ornaments cool completely before decorating and adding string to hang them. This only takes a few minutes if you move the ornaments from the baking sheet to a cooling rack.

Corn Starch Ornament Decorating Tips

There are so many different ways to decorate corn starch ornaments! One of the easiest ways to transform plain white ornaments is to paint them with acrylics. This quick drying paint allows you to get a coat on all sides of the ornaments at once. For the ornaments below, we used stencils for the letters, glitter glue sticks and ribbon to decorate. It’s a good idea to seal your artwork with a clear aerosol such as modge podge.

Hand print ornaments commemorate a child’s growth. There are two different ways to do a print-a direct print or the reverse. The photo below shows a reversed hand print. To achieve this look, we took a print in the corn starch dough and baked it. We then used it as a mold for another piece of dough. The result is a 3D handprint that stands out from the background.

Top 5 Red, White & Blue Desserts

I am counting down the days until my favorite holiday, Independence Day! Before we cue the fireworks and break out the grill, I wanted to find the perfect 4th of July dessert to bring to our family cookout. I searched the Clabber Girl recipe archive and chose these five gems! Each one is red, white or blue and will be a crowd pleaser. Now the only thing left is to decide which one to make!

Blueberry BarsBlueberry Bars

These bars look very easy to make and I love that the recipe calls for fresh blueberries! For a bar that sports red, white and blue colors, I would use 1.5 cups strawberries and 1.5 cups blueberries for the filling and then top it off with whipped cream.

2 C. all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp. Clabber Girl Baking Soda
1 Tbsp. Clabber Girl Baking Powder
2 C. quick-cooking rolled oats
1 C. firmly packed brown sugar
1 C. margarine
3 C. blueberries
3/4 C. granulated sugar
1/3 C. water
2 Tbsp. Clabber Girl corn starch
1/4 tsp. salt

For the filling: In a medium saucepan combine blueberries, sugar, water, Clabber Girl Corn Starch and salt. Cook at medium heat about 10 minutes or util thickened. Set aside.

For the dough: In a large bowl, sift together flour, baking soda, and Clabber Girl Baking Powder. Cut in margarine with pastry cutter. Stir in brown sugar and rolled oats.

To assemble: Press half of dough mixture into greased 13 x 9-inch baking pan. Pour blueberry mixture on top; top with other half of flour mixture. Bake at 350° F for 45 minutes, until top is slightly browned. Cool before cutting into bars.

Stars-n-Fruit DessertStars-and-Fruit-Dessert

I love how simple and pretty this dessert looks! Since it calls for the cake to be cut into stars, I can use my star cookie cutter and alternate the star orientation so that there isn’t much wasted cake. I could serve these in mason jars as individual parfaits. This would also be cute to make as a layered cake in a 9×13-inch casserole pan. I could layer the fruit on the bottom, whipped cream dolloped on next and the sponge cake on the top layer. This would allow the fruit to show through the slices of cake and be easy to serve up to a large crowd.

Star Cake:
3 eggs
1 C. granulated sugar
6 Tbsp. orange juice
1 C. sifted cake flour
1 1/2 tsp. Clabber Girl Baking Powder
1/4 tsp. salt
1/4 C. powdered sugar
Fruit:
4 C. mixed berries: blueberries, strawberries, raspberries or blackberries
1 C. granulated sugar
whipped cream, for garnish

For the stars: Grease and flour a 15 x 10-inch sheet pan, preheat oven to 375° F. Beat eggs until light and lemon-colored; add sugar gradually, beating until mixture is very thick. Add the orange juice and mix until blended. Sift together flour, Clabber Girl Baking Powder and salt. Add to the mixture, mixing only enough to blend smoothly. Pour batter into prepared pan and bake for 20 minutes. Cool in pan on wire rack and cool completely. Turn out onto waxed paper. With a 2-inch star cutter, cut out star shapes. Keep cuts as close together as possible. Store shapes on a flat surface until ready to assemble.

Berries: Wash fresh berries; hull and slice any strawberries that you might have.Toss berries with 1 cup sugar. Refrigerate for approximately 1 hour.

To assemble: Place approximately 1 cup berries in each dessert bowl or plate; decorate with a dollop of whipped cream and about 3-4 stars. You can also add red, white or blue sprinkles as a finishing touch for a more festive garnish. Serve immediately.

Summer Vanilla Ice CreamSummer Vanilla Ice Cream

Homemade ice cream is a summer favorite of mine! It’s even better with fresh strawberries and blueberries for a tangy and sweet, yet creamy, dessert. Even a sprinkle of red, white and blue candies could help make this festive for Independence Day.

2 1/2 C. milk
1 1/2 C. heavy cream
2/3 C. granulated sugar
1/4 C. Clabber Girl Corn Starch
1 1/2 Tbsp. vanilla extract
strawberries and blueberries, optional

In a heavy bottomed medium saucepan, gradually whisk one cup of the milk into the Clabber Girl Corn Starch until the corn starch is dissolved. Whisk in the remaining milk, cream and sugar. Cook over medium low heat, stirring constantly, until the mixture is simmering and slightly thickened, about 8 to 10 minutes. Transfer to a medium bowl set in a larger bowl of iced water. Stir in the vanilla. Let sit, stirring frequently, until completely chilled. Pour the mixture into the container of an ice cream maker and freeze according to the manufacturers instructions. Transfer the frozen ice cream to a large, airtight container. Cover and freeze until firm and set, about 4 hours. Serve frozen.

Strawberry Rhubarb PieStrawberry Rhubarb Pie

I think this would be the perfect pie to bring to a 4th of July party! If you haven’t had rhubarb before, it looks a little like celery, but don’t worry, it tastes nothing like celery and isn’t as fibrous. Sweet strawberries are the perfect compliment to rhubarb, which can be slightly sour. I love pairing these together in a flaky pastry, then topped with a dollop of whipped cream.

Crust:
1 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 tsp. Clabber Girl Baking Powder
1/4 tsp. salt
10 Tbsp. butter, cold and cut into chunks
4 oz. cold water

Filling:
2 Tbsp. Clabber Girl Corn Starch
2 cups fresh rhubarb, chopped
1 cup granulated sugar
3 cups fresh strawberries, sliced
2 Tbsp. butter
1 egg white
2 Tbsp. granulated sugar
1/4 tsp. vanilla

Directions:
Pie crust:
In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, baking powder and salt. Add the chunks of cold butter and mix the butter into the flour using a pastry blender. Continue to do this until the mixture looks like bread crumbs or small pieces of butter. Add the cold water and stir it into the mixture so that it all sticks together. Clump the dough all together to form a ball. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1-2 hours. You want the dough chilled and cold, but not hard.

Roll out the dough to a 13 inch circle on a lightly floured surface. Save some dough for your top lattice strips. Lay the circle of crust dough in your greased pie dish. Roll out the remaining dough and cut into 1 inch wide strips for the lattice top and leave aside until fruit in the pie crust.

Pie Filling:
Whisk Clabber Girl Corn Starch together with 1/4 cup water until well blended. Combine with the rhubarb and sugar in a medium pot and heat until thickened. Then add to strawberries. Add the vanilla and stir all together. Then let sit for about 30 minutes for your filling to thicken. Pour the fruit mixture into the pie crust. Add the butter chunks on top.

Arrange the crust strips in a lattice pattern over the fruit mixture and press the strip ends into the crust. Brush the egg whites onto the top of the crust strips and sprinkle with sugar.

Bake at 400° F. for about 35 minutes or golden in color. Let cool for filling to settle and thicken.

Sugar Cookies

This recipe was submitted by a fellow Clabber Girl employee and it is a recipe box staple! This is one of the rare kinds of sugar cookie recipes that don’t require refrigerating the dough prior to cutting out shapes. If you need a last minute dessert that looks like you spent hours on, bake away, friends! You can top the cookies with sprinkles prior to baking or frost and sprinkle after baking. Either way, these are fun and taste great! They’re the perfect finger food for tiny hands at your 4th of July party.

Old Fashioned Sugar Cookies

3 C. all-purpose flour, sifted
1/2 tsp. salt
1 1/2 tsp. Clabber Girl Baking Powder
1 C. sugar
1 C. butter, softened
1 egg, lightly beaten
3 Tbsp. cream or evaporated milk
1 tsp. vanilla

In a mixing bowl, sift together flour, salt, Clabber Girl Baking Powder and sugar. Cut in butter until fine. Add the slightly beaten egg, cream (or evaporated milk), and vanilla. Roll out dough on slightly floured surface. Sprinkle with sugar. Cut out with cookie cutters and place on a baking sheet. Bake at 400° F for 5 to 8 minutes until edges just start to brown. Makes 2 to 3 dozen cookies, depending on the size of cookie cutters used. From the Clabber Girl Recipe Book “RECIPES TO WARM THE HEART”- Submitted by Sherry Wood.

Top 10 STEM Activities for Oobleck aka Corn Starch Goo

Oobleck Activities PinterestWhat is Oobleck?

The name “Oobleck” is derived from the Dr. Seuss book Bartholomew and the Oobleck. It is sometimes called corn starch goo or slime. Oobleck belongs to a class of materials known as “non-Newtonian” fluids, or substances that respond differently depending on how quickly you try to move them around or how much pressure is applied. Oobleck doesn’t follow the rules of solids or liquids, it is both simultaneously. Depending on the transfer of energy, Oobleck can move from liquid to solid and back to liquid again. We have the top 10 ways for kids to interact with Oobleck and learn more about STEM related principals, all while having fun!

Oobleck recipe:

Tips from our team:

  1. Adult supervision is required for all activities. All activities are super fun for adults too!
  2. While testing out these activities, our team used 25 pounds of corn starch and had about 10 participants. Buy your corn starch in bulk directly from our website or your local restaurant supply store. One 16 oz. can of corn starch contains about 2 C. of product, which would work on a couple of the activities below if the Oobleck is re-used or you have just a couple of participants.
  3. For smaller groups of participants, you could mix up one large bowl of Oobleck and test out almost all of the activities (the walk on it activity require more mixture).
  4. We set up the activities as stand alone stations on a large meeting table. Each participant had 5 minutes at each station, for a total of 30 minutes of activity. This circuit was perfect for our participants, but you may want to give different age groups more or less time at each station.
  5. It is easier to add water to the corn starch and mix than to add corn starch to water and try mixing. Getting the proper consistency is a lot easier if you wear rubber gloves and rub the corn starch and water together, similar to making biscuit dough.
  6. We recommend protecting surfaces with plastic table cloths and people with aprons! Gloves are also great for mixing the Oobleck, which can get stuck under finger nails.
  7. Oobleck is easily washed off skin with soap and water.
  8. If Oobleck gets on clothing, wipe them off with a wet cloth and any remaining stains should come out in the washing machine if washed promptly.
  9. Oobleck can be kept in an airtight container for 24 hours, but may require more water before it becomes the right consistency again.
  10. Dispose of Oobleck after 24 hours or it can develop mold. Do not pour Oobleck down a drain! We put all of the Oobleck into the bin used for the walking activity and then disposed of it.

#10: Mix ‘n’ Mold

Age range: 3+

Supplies needed:

  • 3-5 qt. bowl
  • 8 C. water
  • 16 C. Clabber Girl Corn Starch
  • gloves, optional

Activity:

  1. Mix Oobleck with your hands.
  2. Grab a handful and mold it using just your hands. Try creating a cube or a sphere shape.
  3. Try to break the Oobleck into two pieces by grabbing it and pulling it apart rapidly.
  4. Open your hand and allow the Oobleck to drip back into the bowl.

What you’ll learn:

Oobleck is fun to mix up using just your hands. It can be molded into shapes, but as soon as you stop trying to mold it, Oobleck will not hold its shape. Oobleck will hold its shape when you exert force upon it. As soon as the force is lowered or removed, it returns to a liquid state and becomes slimy or gooey.

Let it Go Oobleck Activity#9: Let it go!

Age range: 3+

Supplies needed:

  • 3-5 qt. bowl
  • 8 C. water
  • 16 C. Clabber Girl Corn Starch
  • gloves, optional

Activity:

  1. Mix Oobleck together in the bowl.
  2. Pass Oobleck in between your hands and let it stretch out as you move your hands to different heights.

What you’ll learn:

When you dip your hands into Oobleck and allow it to melt off, you can experience the liquid state of this non-Newtonian liquid. When you do not exert force on Oobleck, gravity alone will act on it. This causes Oobleck to fall off one hand and onto the second hand below.

Colorful Oobleck Activity#8: Make it Colorful

Age range: 3+

Supplies needed:

  • gloves, recommended
  • 8 C. water
  • 16 C. Clabber Girl Corn Starch
  • 3-5 qt. bowl
  • liquid water colors
  • 2 C. plastic bowls

Activity:

  1. Put on gloves to prevent the water color from temporarily staining your hands.
  2. Mix Oobleck together in the bowl.
  3. Grab the Oobleck with a gloved hand and break off a piece.
  4. Add the Oobleck to your smaller plastic bowl.
  5. Add liquid water color to change the Oobleck color.
  6. Try combining two different colors to create a completely new color.
  7. Can you make orange, teal, brown or grey?

What you’ll learn:

When you grab Oobleck, you can break off a piece just by the force of action of your hand. Mix different colors and even create tie dye effects in your mixing bowl. Older children can be taught that mixing different colors together creates brand new colors, such as red and yellow creating orange.

Melt Oobleck Activity

#7: Get Melty

Age range: 3+

Supplies needed:

  • 3-5 qt. bowl
  • 8 C. water
  • 16 C. Clabber Girl Corn Starch

Activity:

  1. Mix Oobleck together in the bowl.
  2. Dip your hand in Oobleck slowly.
  3. Watch how the Oobleck melts off of your fingers.

What you’ll learn:

By slowly interacting with Oobleck, it will remain in a liquid state and stick to your hands like slime. Even though you are not exerting force on the Oobleck, gravity will pull the mixture down to the ground.

Surface Tension Oobleck Activity#6: Feel the Tension

Age range: 3+

Supplies needed:

  • 9-inch pie plate
  • 4 C. water
  • 8 C. Clabber Girl Corn Starch

Activity:

  1. Mix Oobleck together in the pie plate.
  2. Quickly slap the surface with your hand.
  3. Alternatively, try slowly sinking your hand into the pie plate to see what happens.

What you’ll learn:

When you quickly slap the surface, the Oobleck instantly firms up instead of allowing your hand to break through. This is due to the surface tension created by the tiny granules of corn starch suspended in water.

Walk on Oobleck Activity#5: Walk on it

Age range: 3+

Supplies needed:

  • large storage-type plastic bin
  • (3) 3.5 lbs. Clabber Girl Corn Starch Tubs
  • 1.5 tubs of water (use empty Clabber Girl tubs)
  • rubber gloves (optional)
  • chair
  • towels

Activity:

  1. Pour corn starch into bin, then slowly add in water.
  2. Use your hands to mix the Oobleck to the right consistency. You may want to wear rubber gloves while mixing the Oobleck together.
  3. Set up the station so that kids can remove their shoes, have help into the bin, walk across the surface, have help out of the bin and into a chair to wipe off their feet (if needed) and put on their shoes again.

What you’ll learn:

Oobleck is much like water-logged stand on a beach. If you quickly walk across the surface, you do not sink and may not even get any of the goo on your feet. However, if you stand still, you will start to sink into the mixture. This is due to the surface tension created by the tiny granules of corn starch suspended in water.

Heat Treatment Oobleck Activity#4: Heat Treatment

Age range: 10+

Supplies needed:

  • 5 qt. heat-safe bucket
  • 8 C. water
  • 16 C. Clabber Girl Corn Starch
  • hair dryer
  • 2 C. plastic bowls

Activity:

  1. Mix Oobleck together in the bucket.
  2. Heat Oobleck with a hair dryer on high for 3-4 minutes. Be careful not to touch the Oobleck as it will be hot!
  3. Try pouring the Oobleck into the smaller bowls, or just swirling it around the heat-safe bucket.
  4. Determine if the Oobleck becomes a solid or a liquid when heat is applied.

What you’ll learn:

When Oobleck is heated, it is more likely to stay in a liquid state even when force is applied. While in this slimy state, you can swirl it around the bowl and pour it more easily. If you let the Oobleck rest, its temperature will normalize, causing it to return to its normal state.

Freeze Treatment Oobleck Activity#3: Freeze Treatment

Age range: 6+

Supplies needed:

  • 3 qt. bowl
  • 8 C. water
  • 16 C. Clabber Girl Corn Starch
  • freezer

Activity:

  1. Mix Oobleck together in the bowl.
  2. Put Oobleck into freezer for two hours.
  3. You can make the Oobleck the night before and allow to freeze overnight, but take it out of the freezer 2-3 hours before you plan on using it.
  4. Build your own shapes out of the frozen mixture and stack the shapes to see how high you can go before it starts to melt.

What you’ll learn:

When Oobleck is frozen, it is more likely to stay in a solid state even while manipulated. While in this solid state, you have to use your hands to remove it from the bowl. Trying to force out the Oobleck with a scoop or other object won’t work as the Oobleck will seize up. However, the more you work with it, the heat from hands will transfer to the mixture, causing it to revert to its normal state.

Sink or Float Oobleck Activity#2: Sink or Float?

Age range: 3+

Supplies needed:

  • clear plastic bin (ours was 4-inches tall by 12-inches wide by 18-inches long)
  • enough Oobleck to fill the bin with 2-inches of corn starch goo
  • everyday waterproof objects such as bath toys, water bottles, silverware, action figures, etc.
  • sandbox tools (optional)

Activity:

  1. Pour corn starch into bin, then pour in water.
  2. Mix Oobleck together in the bin.
  3. Pick out several common objects and guess if they will sink or float.
  4. Place the object on top of the Oobleck and allow it to sit on the surface for 30 seconds.
  5. Record how the objects reacted once placed on the Oobleck and again after 30 seconds.

What you’ll learn:

This activity can help to demonstrate density of objects to children. It isn’t the size of the object that determines whether it will sink or float, but the object’s density. Heavier metal items are likely to sink after 30 seconds. Lighter or air-filled objects such as bath toys and action figures will stay on top of the surface. The plastic bin may also be the perfect shape for kids to experiment and dig in with sandbox tools.

De-Stress Oobleck Activity#1: De-stress

Age range: 10+

Supplies needed:

  • 2 funnels
  • straws, optional
  • 3-4 water bottles
  • colorful party balloons
  • 3-4 C. Clabber Girl Corn Starch
  • 1.5 – 2 C. water

Activity:

  1. Attach the opening of a balloon to the top of the bottle filled with Oobleck.*
  2. Flip the bottle over and squeeze the contents of the bottle into the balloon until it is 3/4 full.
  3. Take the balloon off the bottle, remove any extra air and tie off the balloon.
  4. Cut the end off of a second balloon, and cover the filled balloon to give it extra protection.
  5. Move the Oobleck inside the balloons. Try squishing it with your hands, rubbing it against a hard surface or stretching the balloon out.

*It is easiest to mix Oobleck in the water bottle instead of trying to add already mixed Oobleck to the bottle. Using a funnel, fill the water bottles with 1 C. of Clabber Girl Corn Starch each. You may use a straw to help get the corn starch to flow down the funnel. Once all of the bottles are filled with corn starch, slowly add in 1/2 C. of water. Put the cap onto the water bottle and shake to mix the Oobleck together.

What you’ll learn:

Oobleck flows slowly and cannot be forced from one vessel to another. If you try to scoop the Oobleck into a balloon, the force you exert on the vessel is likely cause the Oobleck to seize up. Once the Oobleck is added to the balloon, it can easily be manipulated, making it the perfect medium for a stress ball! Adding the second layer of balloon is essential as squeezing the balloon too hard or filling the balloon too much can result in leaks.