Herbed Chicken with Cream Sauce

Are you looking for a simple chicken recipe that is super easy and loaded with flavor? This Herbed Chicken with Cream Sauce recipe is just that. Juicy and flavorful with the cream sauce, serve with your favorite vegetables or a side salad to round out the meal.

My family loves chicken meals and it’s nice to change up different flavors. This Herbed Chicken with Cream Sauce is easy and comes together fast, great for any night of the week!

Herbed Chicken 4
The chicken breasts are simply seasoned with herbs and baked.

Herbed Chicken 1
A cream sauce is made from chicken, the drippings from baking and cream to drizzle over the chicken.

Herbed Chicken 3
The herby chicken flavors are sure to please and delicious all times of the year! The blend of flavors of thyme, parsley and basil.

For meal variations, serve over rice, or pasta, or pair with your favorite vegetables and a roll.

Herbed Chicken with Cream Sauce

Ingredients:
2 pounds chicken breast
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon butter
1/4 cup onion diced
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon dried mustard powder
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon dried parsley
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 1/2 cup chicken broth
3/4 cup heavy cream
2 tablespoons Clabber Girl Corn Starch

Directions: 
In a small pan add the olive oil, butter, onions, and garlic and sauté them. In a small mixing bowl add the thyme, salt, mustard powder, pepper, parsley, and basil and mix together. Then add the sautéed onions and garlic to the herb mixture. Pour the chicken broth to a 9 x 13 baking dish. Rub each chicken breast in the herb mixture on both sides then place them in the baking dish with the chicken broth. Cover with foil and bake at 350 degrees for 1 hour.

Remove chicken breast from the oven. Remove them from the baking dish and cover to keep warm. Pour chicken broth and drippings into a medium sauce pan to make the sauce. Add the cream and whisk together. Add corn starch to the sauce and bring to a boil for about 2 minutes to thicken the sauce. Add salt and pepper to taste if needed. Drizzle over herbed chicken. Serve.
Serve with your favorite vegetable sides, over rice or pasta for an added complete meal.

 

Chili Soup – Six Ways!

There are so many ways to celebrate the SuperBowl, but we think there’s no better way than cheering your team on with a warm bowl of chili at your side! Just as there are many ways to celebrate SuperBowl Sunday, there are numerous ways to prepare chili. We’ve searched our archives and found six totally different chili recipes for you to try out. Ranging from spicy hot to vegan zucchini, each is unique in its own way. All recipes include our special chili seasoning recipe, which you can add to taste.

Hot Chili

  • 1/4 c. Chili Seasoning
  • 2.5 lb. beef top round, fat trimmed and diced into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 2 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 diced onion
  • 2 diced poblano peppers
  • 2 diced Anaheim chilies
  • 3-4 diced fresh jalapeno peppers
  • 2 Tbsp. chopped garlic
  • 2 Tbsp. dried oregano
  • 2 Tbsp. ground cumin
  • 1/2 c. Tequila
  • 1/2 bunch cilantro chopped
  • 1/4 c. lime juice
  • 24 oz. can crushed tomatoes
  • 1 c. tomato sauce
  • 1 c. beef stock
  • salt and pepper, to taste

Coat the diced meat with 1/4 cup of the Chili Seasoning. In a large braiser, heat the olive oil and add the seasoned beef. Brown on all sides. Add the onion, garlic and the fresh chilies and sauté until the onions are soft. Add the Tequila and cook until liquid is reduced by half.

Add tomato products and beef broth and bring to a boil then turn down to a high simmer. Simmer until meat is tender. Adjust seasoning as desired. Finish with lime juice and chopped cilantro.

Hot Chili

Mild Chili

  • 2-3 Tbsp. Chili Seasoning (to taste)
  • 3 lbs. lean ground beef
  • 1 cup chopped celery
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • 1 cup chopped green bell pepper
  • 1 large jalapeno, finely chopped
  • 2 (16-oz.) cans hot chili beans
  • 1 (22-oz.) can tomato juice
  • 1 (15-oz.) can diced tomatoes
  • 1 (15-oz.) can tomato puree
  • 1 (10-oz.) can beef broth
  • 3 tablespoons barbeque Sauce
  • 4 tablespoons Kahlua
  • 4 tablespoons Vodka
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

In a large stockpot, combine ground beef and chili seasoning. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until beef begins to turn crusty brown. Add celery, onion, green pepper and jalapeno; cook until vegetables are tender. Add un-drained chili beans, tomato juice, tomatoes, tomato puree, broth, BBQ sauce, Kahlua, Vodka and Worcestershire sauce. Mix well and simmer, stirring occasionally. May place this chili in slow cooker to keep warm.

Mild Chili

Quick ‘n Easy Turkey Chili

  • 1-2 Tbsp. Chili Seasoning (to taste)
  • 1 pound ground turkey
  • 2 cups chopped onion
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • Two 16-oz. cans kidney beans, rinsed and drained
  • One 28-oz. can whole tomatoes; un-drained and chopped

Combine turkey, onion and garlic in a Dutch oven; Cook until turkey is browned, stirring to crumble. Drain off drippings. Add remaining ingredients; cover, reduce heat, and simmer 30 minutes stirring occasionally.

Quick-n-Easy-Turkey-Chili

Chicken Chili with Corn and Cannellini Beans

  • 2-3 Tbsp. Chili Seasoning (to taste)
  • 3 1/2 to 4 pound chicken
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 green bell peppers, diced
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 2 cups fresh, frozen or canned corn kernels
  • 1 can cannellini beans, drained and rinsed
  • optional toppings:
    • grated cheddar or Jack cheese
    • sour cream
    • chopped scallions

Combine the chicken, half the onion and enough water just to cover. Simmer for 1 hour and transfer the chicken to a plate. Boil the broth until it is reduced to 4 cups. Discard the skin and bones from the chicken and chop the meat coarsely.

In a large saucepan, cook the remaining onion, green peppers and garlic in the oil, stirring over moderate heat until golden. Stir in the chili seasoning and cook for 1 minute. Stir in 3 cups of the broth, the chicken, cumin and pepper and simmer the chili for 30 minutes.

Stir in the corn and beans and simmer another 15 minutes.

Chicken Chili with Corn and Cannellini Beans

Super Sausage Chili

  • 2 Tbsp. Chili Seasoning (to taste)
  • 2 lbs. hot sausage (May use Italian sausage)
  • 1 c. chopped onion
  • 2 (14 oz.) cans red kidney beans
  • 1 (15 oz.) can stewed tomatoes
  • 1 (12 oz.) can tomato paste
  • 2 Tbsp. prepared mustard
  • 2 c. water

In a skillet, brown sausage and onion. Crumble sausage until it is in very small pieces. When sausage is brown, drain grease and add to large stock pot. Add remaining ingredients and cook on medium heat until mixture comes to a boil. Turn down heat to simmer and cook at least 2 hours.

Super Sausage Chili

Vegan Zucchini Chili

  • 2-3 Tbsp. Chili Seasoning (to taste)
  • 4 to 6 cups zucchini, unpeeled and grated
  • 1 cup celery, sliced
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 3 Tablespoons oil
  • 1 15-oz. can tomato sauce, plus 1 can water
  • 1 28-oz. can tomatoes
  • 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper, or to taste
  • 1 15-oz. can kidney beans
  • 1 cup fresh sliced mushrooms
  • green olives, sliced (optional)
  • shredded vegan cheese (optional)

In a pan, sauté zucchini, celery and onion in oil for about 6 minutes. Add tomato sauce, water, tomatoes, chili seasoning to zucchini mixture and simmer for 1 to 1 1/2 hours (this mixture can be frozen, and remaining ingredients added later). Add kidney beans, mushrooms and green olives; simmer for 15 minutes.

Vegan Zucchini Chili

Hashed Turnips: A Rumford Complete Cookbook Recipe

It’s time again for another Rumford Complete Cookbook Recipe! Looking through the cookbook this month, I was looking for a recipe that I could use some fall produce that we grow. I found the Hashed Turnips recipe.


Hashed Turnips Close

I am a new fan of turnips, only first trying them a few years ago. We have grown them for several years and sell at our local farmers market, but I had never tried them. So a few years ago when we were picking for our farmers market, I tried one. Fresh right out of the garden. To my surprise they are so good!!

Raw Turnips

I think of them as a mix of kohlrabi, radish, and cabbage flavors all mixed together in one!! And so tasty raw! We just slice them up and eat them raw.

So when I saw this Hashed Turnips recipe, I was excited to try something new with them.

And it is SO delicious!! Next time making though, I will cut the salt in half just to suit my liking better. My turnips also were not large size, like they can grow to get, so I used 2 medium ones. I also used a purple top turnip, as that is what we grow.

The Hashed Turnips recipe is on page 70 in the Rumford Complete Cookbook. Below is a photo of the recipe.

Rumford Hashed Turnips

Here is my version with some updates.

Hashed Turnips

Ingredients
1 large turnip or 2 medium – about 3 cups cubed turnips.
2 Tbsp Butter
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 cup cream
1/4 tsp pepper
1 Tbsp parsley, chopped

Directions
Peel the turnips and slice thickly and then cut into small cubes. Cook them in boiling water until tender. Drain the water and return the turnip cubes back to the pan. Add the remaining ingredients; the butter, salt, pepper, parsley, and cream. Mix and bring to a boil. Serve.

Hashed Turnips Hero

Superbowl of Soup (Infographic)

I recently sat down with our culinary Chef, Brittany, to brainstorm some great soup ideas to feed a crowd. We wanted to start with our basic Irish Soup recipe and adapt it for any ingredients you may have on hand. In many cultures, dishes start with a vegetable base. In French cooking, this is called Mirepoix. In Cajun and Creole cooking, it is called the Holy Trinity. Each of these cultures has a classic vegetable combination that many savory dishes begin with. In many grocery stores, you can even purchase a jar or frozen package of Mirepoix or Holy Trinity. We have paired 6 different vegetable combinations with spices and traditional meats and seasoning so that you can easily substitute with what you have on hand. Alternatively, you can make this dish vegetarian by using vegetable stock and doubling up on the veggies.

Superbowl Inspired Super Soups

Thanksgiving Bread Basket

What will be in your bread basket?

The turkey gets a lot of talk. The stuffing is carefully seasoned. The pie crusts are delicately rolled out and the pumpkin filling properly spiced. But what about the bread? For some, Grandma’s age-old yeast roll recipe is a Thanksgiving must, while others stick to buttermilk biscuits or cornbread. And while all of these are delicious traditional options, what if your family doesn’t have a bread tradition? Or, better yet, maybe your Friendsgiving is an opportunity to take a (gasp) break from tradition?

bread basket

Double duty options

Add dimension and whole-grain flavor to your Thanksgiving table with this seeded wheat quick bread.  With no yeast needed, this bread has crusty goodness you like without all of the extra time and work. Make a double batch and the leftovers can be used for a turkey sandwich on Friday.

Havarti cheese and dill flavors will give your basic buttermilk biscuits a holiday makeover!

Or maybe you want to stick with the traditional flavors of Thanksgiving?

Move the sweet potatoes from the casserole dish to the breadbasket? These sweet potato biscuits have the familiar hints of cinnamon and nutmeg that you have come to know and love with this side dish.

Baking gluten-free bread this Thanksgiving?

These white cheddar scallion biscuits have the cheesy goodness that you crave. Another good, cheesy gluten-free option—gluten-free parmesan rosemary rolls. Who doesn’t love a good herb-filled dinner roll at the Thanksgiving table?

Choose one or all six. Whatever your choice, you’re bound to surprise your guests by breaking with tradition and having a little adventure in the kitchen this Thanksgiving!

Savory Zucchini Skillet Cake

A how-to for summer’s favorite veggie

Zucchini presents the classic summertime conundrum. The good news is that it’s easy to grow. The bad news? It’s so easy to grow that anyone who includes it in a vegetable garden is pretty much guaranteed to have more zucchini than they can use. One they’ve shared the bounty with co-workers and neighbors, they’ll then spend the months of August and September trying to slip the prolific squash into as many recipes as possible. Happily, though, zucchini is an easygoing ingredient, and its mild flavor works well in all sorts of dishes. It can also play a starring role, as it does in this Savory Zucchini Skillet Cake. Paired with a salad, this vegetarian recipe makes a great light entrée. It also lends itself to improvisation and is great with even more veggies tossed in — or add some cooked sausage or ground beef for a heartier dish.

Savory Zucchini Skillet Cake 2 (1)

 

Savory Zucchini Skillet Cake

Serves 8

1 to 2 tablespoons olive oil

6 cups diced zucchini (about 3 medium)

1 cup chopped onions (about 1 medium)

Salt and pepper to taste

1 ½ cups flour

2 ¼ teaspoons Clabber Girl baking powder

¾ teaspoons salt

½ teaspoon dried oregano

¼ cup vegetable oil

4 beaten eggs

1 cup shredded cheddar or taco cheese

Smoked paprika

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

In a large non-stick skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the zucchini and onions, season generously to taste with salt and pepper and sauté until onions are softened, about 5 minutes. Set aside.

In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, salt and oregano. Stir in oil until flour is moistened. Add shredded cheese and sautéed zucchini and onions and stir well to combine. Batter will be thick.

Lightly oil a 10-inch iron skillet. Transfer batter to oiled skillet, sprinkle with smoked paprika and bake at 350 degrees for 40 to 45 minutes. Cut into slices. Serve hot or at room temperature.

 

Baking Terms Glossary

Baking Basics and Definitions

You’re baking bread for the first time and you can’t wait for the savory smell of rising dough to start wafting through your house. You bought all high quality ingredients and have been following the recipe to the letter, until one little phrase throws you off – “fold the dough.”

Folding the dough? Like a t-shirt? If you’re confused, don’t worry; you’re not the only one. Most, if not all, first-time bakers encounter specific terminology that makes them shake their heads. That’s why we’ve compiled this list of common basic baking techniques.

So go ahead, bust out those brand new recipes this weekend and give them a whirl.

Baking powder: A leavener used for cooking; an inert filler used to keep ingredients separated.

Baking soda: An alkaline ingredient, and when mixed with acidic ingredients, it reacts and releases bubbles of carbon dioxide.

Beat: Thoroughly combine ingredients and incorporate air with a rapid, circular motion.

Bulk fermentation: Let your yeast bread dough sit and rise at room temperature for two hours. This will make your flavor and texture richer and fluffier.

Buttercream: Soft, spreadable icing that is commonly used on cakes, cupcakes and cookies. Buttercream is versatile and often takes on a flavor such as chocolate or salted caramel.

Caramelize: Heat sugar until it is melted and brown.

Creaming: Blend all ingredients to create a fluffy mixture.

Crimp: Seal the edges of two layers of dough with the tines of a fork or your fingertips.

Crumb coat: A thin layer of frosting that is applied to the cake to keep crumbs “trapped” so that they don’t appear on the final layer of frosting. Refrigerate your cake for 15 minutes between applying the crumb coat and the final layer of frosting.

Cutting in: Combine the flour and dry ingredients with the fat quickly, which is why this
technique is often used with butter. Toss chunks of cold butter into the flour and use a
pastry blender (or two knives, but trust us, the pastry blender is far easier) to mix.

Dash: A measurement less than ⅛ teaspoon.

Docking: Prick the dough with a fork before baking to let some of the steam vent. This is
particularly useful for shortbread.

Double boiler: Used to melt delicate ingredients such as chocolate that can burn easily. To make a double boiler, place a bowl on top of a pan of simmering water. The bowl will not touch the water, but the steam from the water will help heat the ingredient at a lower temperature than if it had direct contact with the bottom of the pan.

Dulce de leche: A caramel-like sauce that is created by heating milk and salt over a double boiler on a medium heat. Let mixture cook for 1- 1 ½ hours, stirring occasionally and adding water when necessary. The mixture should be thick and dark-caramel colored. When finished heating, beat until smooth.

Dust: The light sprinkling of baked good or other surface with a dry ingredient like flour, meal, or powdered sugar.

Fold in: Gently combine a heavier mixture with a more delicate substance, such as beaten egg whites or whipped cream, without causing loss of air.

Glaze: Brushing food with milk, egg, or sugar before baking in order to produce a shiny golden finish; to brush a thin coating of icing on top of a baked cake, cookie or bread to give the food a sweet and shiny finish.

Knead: Fold, push, and turn dough or other mixture to produce a smooth, elastic texture.

Leavening: The production of a gas in a dough batter using an agent like baking powder, yeast, baking soda, or even egg whites. Leavening agents work via the production of gas in the dough.

Partially set: Refrigerate a gelatin mixture until it thickens to the consistency of unbeaten egg whites

Piping: Use a pastry bag to add frosting and other creamy toppings to cupcakes, cakes
and cookies; piping can also be used to fill pastries.

Proofing: When you give your bread dough one final rise. Shape your dough into loaves and let them sit in the refrigerator. This will give the dough extra flavor and improves the bread quality, from crust to crumb.

Sifting: Pass the flour through a sifter to add air for a light, spongy texture; this can also help accurately measure ingredients.

Softened: Margarine, butter, ice cream, or cream cheese that is in a state soft enough for easy blending, but not melted.

Unleavened: Baked goods that do not use a leavening agent like baking soda, cream of tartar, baking powder, or yeast.

Whisk: Hand or electric whisking will incorporate air into the mixture, creating lighter
texture.

Secrets to Using a Cast-Iron Skillet

Ingredients for cooking and empty cast iron skillet
Ingredients for cooking and empty cast iron skillet

Inexpensive and durable, naturally nonstick and nearly indestructible, cast-iron skillets are a kitchen essential.

They last for generations, so the same skillet that brought you grandma’s juicy fried chicken now helps you whip up a decadent Apple Pecan Skillet Cake. The best part? The more you use it, the better it gets.

Cast-irons season over time. The oils and flavors from everything that’s touched its surface help the skillet become naturally nonstick. Regularly seasoning your cast-iron skillet will keep it in prime condition to bake for years. Here’s a quick how-to:

1. Wash the skillet with warm water and a sponge or stiff brush. Only use soap if you’re preparing to season it. Otherwise, use only water!

2. Rinse and dry the skillet thoroughly, then coat it with a thin layer of vegetable oil or shortening.

3. Bake in a 325 degree oven for 1 hour. Let the skillet cool completely, then store away.

Here are four ways you can put the cast-iron to work in your own kitchen.

Searing and Sautéing

Take advantage of cast-iron’s reputation for being stovetop and oven-friendly. Begin cooking dishes in the piping hot skillet on the stove, and finish the process in the oven.

Braising that Bursts with Flavor

Since cast-iron skillets heat evenly, and at a steady temperature, they’re perfect for braising meat or vegetables in stock and spices. Try this Braised Winter Vegetable Gratin as a comforting side dish.

Baking – Browned and Buttery

Because the surface of a cast-iron heats evenly and continuously, breads come out toasty and moist, while pies swell with rich, golden crusts. Baking with cast-iron creates sweet and savory dishes that everyone will enjoy. We love the rustic touch of Skillet Buttermilk Biscuits, slathered with warm honey butter. You could also pair a hearty stew with this Easy Mexican Cornbread or finish off a meal with this Blackberry Lime Cobbler.

Frying – The Golden Standard

With cast-iron’s steady, even heat, just an inch or so of oil is all it takes to conjure up some Home Made Corn Dogs or Fried Chicken Wings, two of the most delicious comfort recipes we know.

Using a cast-iron skillet with some of your favorite recipes can open a new world of flavor to your food. A cast-iron skillet that’s well-used and well-loved is more than a kitchen utensil – it’s a treasured family heirloom.

How to Infuse Maple Syrup

8 Ways to Contribute on Earth Day

BMF-SyrupDisplay

Few things are as satisfying as made-from-scratch breakfasts on weekend mornings. A sizzling griddle, the smell of coffee enveloping the kitchen, shamelessly wearing pajamas until noon – what’s not to love? Whether your go-to breakfast is pancakes, waffles, or some sweet, magical hybrid (Handle the Heat combines waffles and doughnuts!), the common ground is passing the maple syrup around the table.

We know it and love it as a sweet and pourable pancake topper, but have you considered getting out the maple syrup bottle past 10 am? The syrup is a surprisingly versatile ingredient, lending itself well to sweet pastries (like these smoked bacon biscuits!), as well as savory main dishes.

We recently caught up with Tim Burton, the mastermind behind the maple syrup production hub, Burton’s Maplewood Farm. The company has given traditional maple syrup a twist that transcends breakfast, encouraging customers to think beyond the waffle. Burton’s method? Aging maple syrup for twelve months in liquor barrels that formerly held whiskey, bourbon, rum and brandy. The company will even partner with bourbon-producing giant Pappy Van Winkle this fall to develop a high-end, unique barrel-aged syrup that whiskey aficionados can’t wait to taste!

We’re taking a hint from Burton’s and trying our hand at homemade maple syrup infusions. You can try it, too! As Burton advises, pick out your favorite herbs, spices, or flavors (think cooked pieces of bacon or chopped rosemary). Put them in a small saucepan, adding however much maple syrup you’d like to infuse. More spice equals more intense flavor. Cook the mixture on medium heat until the desired intensity is achieved. It’s as simple as that!

Try some of these flavor infusions to get started:

  • Bacon – The smoky flavor will enhance the maple, making it an excellent choice for breakfast dishes, BBQ sauces or even atop roasted Brussels sprouts!
  • Dill – Burton recommends finely chopping dill and heating it with maple syrup to glaze both sides of salmon filets before cooking.
  • Citrus – Add orange rind and cinnamon sticks for syrup that’s divine drizzled over cinnamon rolls or peaches for a simple dessert.

The options are endless! So get in the kitchen and start experimenting with your favorite herbs and spices. If you’re intrigued, but not as confident developing your own combinations yet, then stick to these tried and true maple recipes from Clabber Girl.

Maple Bourbon Pecan Tart

The nuttiness of the pecans, paired with brown sugar, bourbon and sweetness of the maple makes this a winning fall entertaining dessert.

Sweet Potato and Sausage Pancakes

Sweet potato, sausage and syrup IN the pancakes? Hearty enough for breakfast at dinnertime!

Fried Chicken Conquers Menus Worldwide

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Who knew that the “it” dish of the past few years would be served in the form of good, old-fashioned fried chicken? From major cities to small towns, from trendy gastropubs to mom-and-pop diners, menus worldwide are featuring some seriously creative combinations of this traditional southern fare.

Fried chicken has a unique history in the U.S. that goes back even before the Civil War. However, it was in the early 1900s that a special blend of herbs and spices revamped the popularity of the dish. It was then that Colonel Sanders, founder of the fast food chain Kentucky Fried Chicken, set his sights on franchising his recipe, putting the spotlight on this age-old comfort food.

While we never need a reason to celebrate food, we figure the Colonel’s birthday is the perfect time to celebrate this southern staple and try out some inventive and, of course, delicious, mouth-watering fried chicken recipes.

Branching out for the first time? Try Chicken and Biscuits: Fried chicken and buttermilk biscuits – comfort food doesn’t get much more comforting than that. Clabber Girl’s Good Ole Fried Chicken recipe is the perfect place to start. Since you already need buttermilk for that recipe, go ahead and pair it with our moist and flaky buttermilk biscuits.

Want something sweet and savory? Try Chicken & Waffles: You absolutely can’t go wrong — crunchy, juicy southern-style fried chicken, with just a hint of spice lingering on your tongue, and fresh baked waffles, all drizzled with warm maple syrup.

Focusing on the chicken? Get creative with the breading: Side dishes come and go, but fried chicken always remains. For many fried chicken connoisseurs, it’s all about the breading. Want to keep the sweet but ditch the doughnut? Pull out the graham crackers and cayenne pepper for Graham Cracker Fried Chicken.

Clearly, what fried chicken has done for food is what the little black dress has done for date night. It adds a layer of sophistication, without losing its original appeal. With a dash of creativity, you can create succulent versions of this spectacular fare right in your own kitchen!